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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
permanent normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia
to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the president. that's the message from allies. that's the message from the international community. that's the message from the europeans. that's the message from the egyptians. and even though our own president is traveling abroad in asia, that's the word from the mouth of our own president. ever
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
russia -- what kind of policy she needed to have with russia. >> but rula, let's be fair. sarah palin could see russia from her back yard. i mean -- >> and that's -- >> but he says susan rice doesn't know that much. >> he's the man that picked that woman. you know what? he should reflect -- mccain should reflect about how you should behave when you actually are beaten and defeated. with dignity. and you should actually question yourself about your mistakes, about your choices, and how the country wants you to behave from now on. the country chose barack obama with a large margin. >> twice. >> twice. not once. twice. and maz a message for him, that he needs to actually cooperate with barack obama, not attack him. >> joan, as i said, he questioned what ms. rice, ambassador rice knows. let me explain. ambassador rice, now the u.n. ambassador to the u.n., foreign policy adviser to john kerry, clinton administration '93 to 2001, a rhodes scholar, a ph.d. from oxford university. i mean, as was stated by rula, he didn't question condoleezza rice in 2005, when the whole world was questioning
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
on the least. the "a-team" coming back. the president told russia he would be very flexible aer the election. [inaudible] lou: well, we'r there. now the president has the flexibility and then the travel destination. we will have those for you next. that petraeus sex scandal worsens by the day. did o top spy but classified information and risk? is it just a coincidence that the white house waited until after the election? admiral james lyons joins us next. from 17 billion chips worldwide to a world of super-connected intelligence. the potential of freescale unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to investing with knowledge. the potential of td ameritrade unlocked. nyse eonext. unlocking the world's potential. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner movi forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. ♪ lou: general petraeus agreei
. this is 19th century russia. russia. it's love story. it's great story but what the director has done is he is telling it like a stage play. the majority of the film is shot on an actual stage so. when you are watching it and we have this cool clip here, i'll show you shortly. it is shot just like -- you have the video. look at the camera there. watch the set pieces being moved into frame. that is actually how the movie looks in front of the camera. there are people just moving set pieces and then here comes jude law. he will sit down at that table. >> do you like that? >> it is distracting. >> to quote a song, it's beautiful disaster it is a film that looks gorgeous but it takes away from the story. you focus too much on the process as opposed to engaging in the performance. i think it's film you can watch visually but i had a hard time connecting to the characters. i think it's good matinee with a lot of oscar buzz for it right now. >> that is what i was wondering. >> jude law is fantastic if the film. i feel like the movie could have been less focused on the process and more focused on t
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
in russia, dmitry medvedev expressed relief that man who called russia the top geopolitical foe mitt romney did not win the vote. vladimir putin graduated obama it's hard to guess how he really feels. >> kremlin and putin, the presence of russia is not about showing its emotion or putin about showing his. >> he may remember this moment well. >> after my election, i have more flexibility. >> israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu supported mitt romney said he will continue to work with president obama and says security cooperation between the two countries is rock solid. arab views are mixed. >> i do believe he is well-advised when he comes to the middle east and that is the problem. they don't know how to get up. they don't know how to deal with the -- [ inaudible ] of political and military intervention. >> mixed with the congratulations of world leaders came reminders of the urgent work that needs to be done from stabilizing the global economy and finding revolution to the bloody conflict in syria. certain international initiatives put on hold until november 7. bret? >> bret: amy kell
, but you are engaging with countries for whom doing that is much simplerlike china, like russia, the state capital company where, you know, your company is your arm not only of foreign economic policy, but of foreign policy full stop. how do you operate in a world with players who are operating under these very different rules? >> well, it's something we do spend quite a bit of time thinking about this. it's not all about china. there are issues with other countries like -- >> russia? >> -- like russia, but not just those two. and the lines are really blurred in terms of where the state ends and where capital and corporate interests begin for many countries. at the state department, we've really tried to create mechanisms through multilateral institutions like the oecd has come up with a platform for competitive neutrality which looks at the different ways that governments can act to subsidize or to give favor to their own state-owned or state-led interests and provide some recommendations for engaging in a platform of competitive neutrality. it's a different way of thinking about the chal
submarine detected 300 miles off the east coast of the united states in late october. russia navy commander announced earlier on june 1, the russian nuclear power subs would return to patrolling the world's oceans as they did in the soviet times. >> bret: jennifer griffin live at the pentagon. thank you. we're learning tonight about the new suspects in september's deadly terror attack on the u.s. mission in libya. incident about to come under scrutiny. herron has the latest. >> reporter: -- catherine herridge has the latest. >> reporter: the list of suspects extends handful of militants aligned with the group jamal network fox news learned. it takes its name from abu ahmed released from the egyptian jail in arab spring. he has close ties to al-qaeda leader ayman al-zawahiri. >> i think we are going to find out that jamal is much more active internationally across, not just in libya and egypt but elsewhere. network is involved in really exploring terrorism throughout the middle east. >> u.s. officials believe jamal established training camps in libya and in the camps that some of the fighter
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
in the u.n., quite frankly. they did a good job on libya, but china and russia are walking all over us. i think she is more political operative than anything else, when it comes to benghazi. >> one of the questions here is really who in different parts of our government knew what about what happened? knew the faces about what happened in benghazi on 9/11 and did they share it with everybody else? >> obviously, it's very troubling that ambassador rice' rendition turned out to be incorrect. and we need to get to the bottom of that. >> you want to get to the bottom of benghazi, have you to get obam a. obama is the bottom of benghazi. obama is the bottom of the coverup. that's why i said that this dwarfs wortgate. this is a coverup that dwarfs watergate. there are four people dead in this. >> greta: just in, tampa socialite, jill kelley, at the center of the scandal, had her special friends of macdill i.d. revoked. it gave her easy access to part of the military base. but paula broadwell, a lieutenant colonel in the army reserves got her security clearance suspended. and the fbi agent who hel
romney goes to russia, secretly sends message to putin to ignore his dad's campaign rhetoric. dad's a douche. >> he's a douche. >> stephanie: not evil. this week, mitt romney's son traveled -- reports say allayed any concerns the russian government had about his father's harsh stance on russia. he said rusch sha our number one -- russia, our number one geopolitical foe. >> we have known that for some time. >> matt has business in russia from what i understand. >> stephanie: while in moscow, he told a russian -- to pute than despite campaign rhetoric, his father wants good relations if he becomes president. [ buzzer ] >> stephanie: my dad's a liar. everyone in america knows it. >> my dad's a jerk! can't even have good relations with england. let alone russia. >> stephanie: all right. joyce in shreveport, louisiana. hi joyce. >> caller: hello. >> stephanie: hi. >> caller: i'm calling because i'm an elected official in shreveport and i have at least 30,000 voters in my district. i want to know why the media is s
the world war iii. host: let's go to russia. before the elections, president obama was heard on a hot microphone telling dmitry medvedev that he would have more flexibility after the election. what was he referring to? host: -- guest: romney is sent one of his sons to speak to one of the aids of vladimir putin. policy someone gets frozen during an election. russian policy, in particular. president who was prime minister during that time and now is president again. the relationship with russia has been somewhat fractious lately. secretary of state hillary clinton accused the russians of ridding their election. there were concerned for these popular protests in moscow where there was great oppression by the government and who lashed out at the united states as well. -- and putin lashed out. one of the earlier policies was for a russian reset, and attempted to take a relationship that was good at one. that had turned very fractious and taken from a basic transactional relationship, just dealing with things as they came out, to building a new, strategic relationship in russia. that has so
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's the soviet union. she said was that? but it's a big thing back in the late 80s and early 90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which when it was a foregone conclusion, the terrorists and they took us all by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers. never given too much credit. interestingly enough, all the buildings were built by the bin laden construction company and had the bin laden stamps and buildings. how's that for irony? after that, things kind of change. the world trade in their bombing and september 11, we all know what happened that day. i was flying up winning. we came back from the middle east from another rotation in the monday, september 10 was their first day back. the morning of september 11th is actually flying in it come down very, very early. somebody said hey come you got to look at this. remember the key not the first tower building, what morons could hit tower of that size on a clear day? i tho
will be global governance and others is the autocratic regime. i talk a little bit about russia and china as the autocratic regime in the book and i don't see them proportion those countries in the democratic not by force. we could do it or not do it as a policy decision and other radical islam to establish sharia as the constitutional structure so there are different types of political sense. but i'm saying is the philadelphia sovereignty. thank you for your presentation. the was excellent. contrasting subjects and submission that will further weaken the sovereignty or cause us to be submissive some wouldn't even know what you're talking about, 60, 70% probably but you get into the people in this room that probably do know what you're talking about and that get elected in two years and maybe this the department that might understand this is the use of your offer action or something i thought. i am doing that and i can talk about that a little bit. that is a good question. yes, there is a new work in washington and from some of the think tanks that started the sovereignty caucus and. ther
a couple of hours. what the scientists from russia, france and switzerland and also palestinian doctors did was they opened the grave, they took samples. they didn't even have to extract the body to do that. then they resealed it again. those samples are now going to be independently verified and analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland as well as france. what the palsiestinians tell uss results will be available in three months' time. if poison is found in arafat's remains it would probably cause an uproar in the palestinian territory. for a long time they have been saying israel poisoned the palestinian leader. israel is not even willing to comment on that. even if no poison is found it's hardly going to lay to rest the rumors that arafat was killed. erin? >>> our fifth story "outfront" paula broadwell's next chapter. she has become a tabloid sensation, the woman whose relationship brought down general david petraeus, ending the cia director's storied career. she even made the cover of this week's "people" magazine. yes, it's a great picture. but not a picture she ever wanted to see. so ho
russia, france, switzerland opened the grave, took samples, didn't have to extract the body to do that, and then they resealed it again. the samples will be independently verified and analyzed in labs, russia, switzerland, and france and palestinians are believing they will get results in three months' time, of course, if p l pulonium is found, it will caused an uproar. they have been saying israel poisoned the palestinian leader. even if no poison is found, it will hardly lay to rest the rumors. >>> our fifth story "outfront," paula broadwell's next chapter. she ended david petraeus' career. she made the cover of "people" magazine "sex, lies, and spies." a great picture, but not one she ever wanted to see. what is her next move? suzanne kelly, intelligence correspondent, and spoke with broadwell's brother today. what did he have to say? >> we were told that she is really focused right now on restoring the trust between her and her husband and trying to protect her two sons from all of the publicity that has come along with the public outing of the affair. they have put out very diffe
of this -- also the building of international coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- for romney, obama's regas overseas, his inability to stand up to this
coalitions. russia will be a big player. and on iran, what are our international allies, partners, the guys we do business with at the u.n. -- where is everyone else prepared to be before we go forward? host: on russia, this is the "wall street journal." the defeat was a relief in russia because mitt romney had called moscow the number one political foe of the u.s. it was added that mr. vladimir putin sent a telegram to mr. obama that the kremlin said was secret until the u.s. revealed the contents. dmitry medvedev posted a "congratulations" on twitter. so that was from russia. another foreign policy issue is china. here is the "new york times." warm words from china with a subtext of warning. robust relationships with china while maintaining traditional military ties with the u.s. we do not want to be forced to choose between beijing and washington but what is going on here? guest: it has to be looked at in the context of the campaign that just ended. china emerged as a symbol -- weaknessy, obama's overseas, his inability to stand up to this rising asian power. the united states and china
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
area of the world in which most of threats and challenges. it's not a rising china. it's not a russia seeking to regain its power and stature. real threat to american interests seems to be coming from a broken and dysfunctional middle east in which we're stuck and his problem. and had mitt romney become president as well, middle east is divided into migraines on one hand and root canal operations on the other. there are not a lot of opportunities for solutions. >> gregg: pick your poison. you are right. let's talk specifics. let's talk about iran first. you believe that the president should explore and exhaust diplomacy before you are taking military action. you are very specific. let's put this on the screen. you write this, start with an interim arrange. that deals with the issue of enrichment and forestalls resign to acquire highly enriched uranium to construct a nuke. how can you convinces them to do that? >> the problem is once a society gets to enrich uranium and a assemble a nuclear weapon. how do you forestall it? you can't bomb it out of existence. unless you can change the r
job in libya but since then china and russia is walking all over us. i am not sure she is the strongest advocate. i think she is more political operative more than anything else when it comes to benghazi. i make a prediction. i think there will be a few democrats reluctant to vote for somebody involved what i think is a national security debacle. again, i've been on the other side of this when a republican administration is telling you everything is fine when it's not. >> [inaudible]. >> not yet, no. >> [inaudible]. >> i don't know. again, that's all, you see all, as he said earlier, all these things are flying around. somebody was doing this, somebody was doing that and for example, there's this, the latest is interesting, is this person who was associated with general petraeus said, at some gathering there was two or three libyans being held in the safe house. now the cia has said that's just patently false. all these things are flying around and we don't know. that's why we need an investigation. last one. yeah? >> [inaudible] . >> well, first of all, i think that is
, others is an autocratic regime. i talk a little bit about russia and china as autocratic regimes in the book, and i don't want see any problem with the -- i don't see any problem with the united states pushing those countries if they can, not by force. we could do it or not do it, that's a policy decision. and then, of course, there's radical islam which also is a type of -- would like to establish sharia as the constitutional structure in some countries. so there are different types of political systems, and i'm saying the philadelphia sovereignty is my preferred system. and also i think it's the best system. >> thank you for your presentation. i thought it was excellent. we see this stuff happening all the time, but you've captured it in very vivid, contrasting subjects, sovereignty or submission. and in the u.n. now there are other things being negotiated that would further weaken our sovereignty or cause us to be sub missive. so i'm wondering what your actions are. when i look at the country, some huge percentage wouldn't even know what you're talking about. then you get into
be effective adversely. the dependence of europe and russia and is that necessary? secondly, ongoing arrangements generated over the last two or three decades, largely by an american strategy designed to diminish your independence in russian energy. i play the general rule in georgia and providing access in the near future, is something that i'm sure some russians would like to undercut. so even without a massive outbreak of violence in the region and escalating clinton's and explosions, that would have consequences. very adverse to europe and to the united states. these partners in the negotiating process are motivated the same way as we are, on the part of some individuals, i'm not saying this is the official russian point of view, but some individuals in russia were strategists and might take themselves that we are really sure [inaudible] two that's interesting but let me play devil's advocate for a second. containment, in essence, it's on the brink of war. when the russians were those who may have different interest still be able to achieve some of those objectives when it comes
some money with charles payne. >> my whole thing is we have to talk about russia and indonesia and peru and all that. but on the market, 12,790, 12,950, the intraday support. it is critical somehow that course of the week, otherwise we would be vulnerable 12,500. that is near term. the fear, anxiety, not getting a lot of economic data but on the flip side of that. to underscore that, one of the big deals of the day, titanium metals. it is taking over, huge premium from friday's close. they want to dominate in airplanes. they make titanium, faster airplanes. boeing last year said they will be 34,000 new plant planes buil. that is the rest of the world rocking and rolling. both of these stocks are up, titanium metals. i'm kicking myself for not being in either of them. near-term we're under this impression, longer-term the world will be pretty good. cheryl: anything connected to boeing. charles payne, thank you very much. 15 past the hour, stocks every 15 minutes, nicole, you're watching financials, what you have? nicole: you're right, we're looking at the financials. always says there is
be proposing this tax that would hurt lower-income people the most. other countries, china, india, russia, brazil, none of them would propose that on their own citizens. it is the kind of approach that american enterprise systems not have to have on them, nor working families. >> thank you. i apologize for skipping your rebuttal the next question goes to tim kaine. you have mentioned that already. you noted president obama us plan calls for them to -- obama's plan. are you saying you would not, under any circumstance, vote for an obama budget or an obama bill that came to the senate that says we will cut the bush tax cuts and let them expire? >> i think my proposal is the right proposal. i will not vote for of bills that i know have a no chance of passing the house. you saw what happened this summer. they let the bush tax cuts expire over 250,000. full knowledge nothing would happen. the house passed their bill to make the task cuts permanent. they sent it to the senate with full knowledge it would not happen. the time for the no compromise positions is over. we need a compromise. a year
on in the distribution of the economy and china, conditions in russia. there are a number of problems anew environment. we have not developed a coherent approach because in the first term you learn your job. that is the challenge that the administration is facing. >> people look to the united states for leadership. they look to us because we have for so long been in a position where we've been able because of our resources and military strength, because of our values, we've been able to keep the peace. we have been able to make sure that enemies feared us and make sure allies could count on us. with we step back as we did during president obama's first term and i'm afraid we're going to do the next term ease back and you see when there a vacuum. people that don't share our interests diving into that vacuum. >> i traveled all over the middle east. every leader i talked to believe the united states is weak in leaving. they are having to accommodate to that eventuality. whether it be the saudis or you name the country they are accommodating to american weakness and withdrawal. that means that they accomm
. now a team scientists from russia, switzerland and france will try and determine if the poisoning was the underlying cause of death. if ingested a quantity of the it can am deadly. it destroys dna, the immune system and major organs. but detection, it's not that simple. the drug dekays quickly. losing its radioactive in 2 1/2 years. remember, arafat now has been dead for eight years. scientists anding his remains say it will take at least three months before they have any results and those results could be inconclusive. yasser arafat, he was controversial in life and he remains so now in death. shep. >> shepard: david lee miller in jerusalem. powerball fever has the winning jackpot topping half a billion dollars tonight. lottery officials say it's likely to get bigger. as for your chances of winning, well, we'll crunch those numbers next. plus, don't want to put your aging parents in a nursing home, right? so why not just let them live in the backyard? we'll have that for you just ahead ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the
nations. security council members france, china and russia is the idea that by pursuing this vote they will strengthen the hands of the nod democrat palestinian president mahmoud abbas against the more militant hamas which saw its popularity rise in the wake of that recent conflict in gaza. the palestinian officials for their parts mean they are not looking for a fight here. they are simply trying to advance the cause of peace. listen. we are here to reinstate the two state solution and this we will do tomorrow afternoon. >> and that vote will take place around 3:00 p.m. eastern tomorrow afternoon on what the u.n. named several years ago international palestinian solidarity day. shep. >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations death comes all too frequently now in syria. today it was twin bombings in the capital city of damascus. people ran after the first explosion and that's when the killers detonated a second bomb. nearly 50 people died. there is no word on who is behind the attack. it is but the latest in the bloody battle between syria's government and its rebels. rebel
.s. -israeli relationship and laterals russia and china again were primarily shaped by the white house. >> in washington, james rosen, fox news. >> bret: are we going over the cliff? if an when the president and congress do reach a deal on the fiscal cliff, what will it look like? we'll get some thoughts from the fox all-stars when we return. i put away money. i was 21, so i said, "hmm, i want to retire at 55." and before you know it, i'm 58 years old. time went by very fast. it goes by too, too fast. ♪ but i would do it again in a heartbeat. [ laughs ] ♪ ♪ >>> right now, as we speak, congress can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. so we really need to get this right. i can only do it with the help of the american people. so, tweet, what was that again? my2k. do what it takes to communicate a sense of urgency. we don't have a lot of time here. >> in order to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table. time for the president and the democrats to get serious about the spending problem that our country
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